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Status: Single Individual Filing

Your filing status is single if, on the last day of the year, you are unmarried or legally separated from your spouse under a divorce or separate maintenance decree, and you do not qualify for another filing status.

State law governs whether you are married or legally separated under a divorce or separate maintenance decree.

For a Widow(er). Your filing status may be single if you were widowed before January 1, and did not remarry before the end of of the year.

However, you might be able to use the Head of Household filing status that may give you a lower tax. ie; Widow(er) With Dependent Child.

You can file Form 1040EZ (if you have no dependents, are under 65 and not blind, and meet other requirements), Form 1040A, or Form 1040, show your filing status as single by checking the box on line 1.

Use the Single column of the Tax Table, or Section A of the Tax Computation Worksheet, to figure your tax.

Federal Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 defined marriage as, a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife.

The word spouse refers only to a person of the opposite sex who is a husband or a wife.

Domestic Partners are Considered Unmarried

Domestic partners should consult an experienced tax professional for advice when filing their federal and state tax returns.

Head of Household status will provide more tax benefits than claiming single

in some cases (IRS Publication 501, "Single").

State law governs whether you are married or legally separated under a divorce or separate maintenance decree.

If you are unsure of the legality of your spouses income or income statements, it is advised to file separately to reduce your liability from the other spouses actions.

Married taxpayers can choose between filing a joint tax return or a separate tax return. The Married Filing Separately filing status provides fewer tax benefits than filing joint returns.